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Juvenile Bald Eagle found poisoned near Winlock, Wash.

Posted by thunsdorfer at Mar 26, 2013 01:15 PM |

March 26, 2013: Portland Audubon is releasing a juvenile Bald Eagle on Wednesday, March 27, and you're invited to attend! Staff will be sending the male eagle back into the wild at 1 p.m. in Winlock, Wash. The eagle is one of seven that were found poisoned in the Winlock area last week.

Juvenile Bald Eagle found poisoned near Winlock, Wash.

Wildlife Care Center operations manager Lacy Campbell carries the juvenile bald eagle to a scale during a routine medical exam. The eagle is making a defensive call, a sign that the eagle is now healthy. Photo by Tinsley Hunsdorfer

Portland Audubon is releasing a juvenile Bald Eagle on Wednesday, March 27, and you're invited to attend! Staff will be sending the male eagle back into the wild at 1 p.m. in Winlock, Wash.

The eagle is one of seven that were found poisoned in the Winlock area last week. The birds were feeding on two horses that had been euthanized with a barbiturate called Euthasol and then left exposed in the environment. The other six eagles are being treated at the West Sound Wildlife Center in northern Washington.

“Euthasol acts as a sedative at lower doses, which is why the juvenile eagle was found on the ground and unable to fly,” said Lacy Campbell, the Wildlife Care Center's operations manager. “While the barbiturate worked its way out of his system, we kept the bird hydrated, provided regular meals, and kept him isolated to minimize stress. He’s doing well now and is ready to be released.”

Bald Eagles are a federally protected species, so federal wildlife authorities are now investigating this poisoning case. Harming or killing a Bald Eagle can result in up to a year in jail and a $100,000 fine.

“Leaving poisoned carcasses out in the environment is completely irresponsible,” said Bob Sallinger, Portland Audubon conservation director. “If you don’t properly dispose of euthanized animals, you run the risk of poisoning wildlife like eagles, vultures, coyotes and other scavengers. Carcasses should be disposed of immediately. This is a sad example of how poisons can move through the food chain."

Bald Eagle, flight cage
Wildlife Care Center operations manager Lacy Campbell carries the juvenile Bald Eagle into Portland Audubon's largest flight cage.

 

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