Type size - +
Personal tools
You are here: Home Pressroom Press Releases Portland Audubon talk highlights Oregon’s largest tidal marsh restoration project, Oct. 9

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Portland Audubon talk highlights Oregon’s largest tidal marsh restoration project, Oct. 9

Roy Lowe’s “Restoring Life to a Tidal Marsh” presentation is part of Audubon’s Nature Night series

On Tuesday, Oct. 9, coastal refuge manager Roy Lowe will speak at Portland Audubon about recent efforts to restore tidal salt marsh in the Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge – the largest restoration project of its kind ever constructed in Oregon.

Portland, Ore. Sep 19, 2012

On Tuesday, Oct. 9, coastal refuge manager Roy Lowe will speak at Portland Audubon about recent efforts to restore tidal salt marsh in the Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge – the largest restoration project of its kind ever constructed in Oregon.

Lowe’s presentation is part of Portland Audubon's monthly Nature Night lecture series. Each 7 p.m. lecture is free and open to the public, so guests are invited to grab a seat and learn more about the natural world.

A thriving tidal marsh is more than just a pretty place. This valuable component of the coastal ecosystem is enormously productive, supporting a rich array of invertebrates, fish, birds and mammals. Tidal marshes offer shelter and food for wildlife, ranging from young salmon to shorebirds and songbirds that migrate along Oregon’s coast.

Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge contains the largest remaining tidal salt marsh within southern Oregon’s Coquille River estuary. It is an oasis for migrating shorebirds, waterfowl and Coho salmon. Many decades ago, the 418-acre section of Bandon known as the Ni-les’tun Unit had been diked and turned into pastures, ruining the marsh habitat.

Lowe will tell the story of restoring the unit to the historic salt marsh habitat. The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its many partners worked on restoring Ni-les'tun for more than a decade, completing the restoration in September 2011. This complex project is the largest tidal marsh restoration project ever constructed in Oregon, and it doubled the amount of tidal salt marsh habitat within the estuary.

Roy W. Lowe is the Project Leader for the Refuge Oregon Coast National Wildlife Complex. The complex includes six National Wildlife Refuges and two Wilderness Areas along 320 miles of the Oregon coast.

###

Document Actions
powered by Plone | site by Groundwire Consulting and served with clean energy